Lindus, Asiana – Part II

Continued From Lindus, Asiana – Part I  The final, monumental staircase, originally constructed in the first half of the 3rd century BCE, led up through a monumental propylaia. Unfortunately, not much of the propylaia survives, really just markings on the pavement that show the original foundations of it. The staircase too is mostly reconstructed. The…

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Lindus, Asiana – Part I

Most Recent Visit: July 2021 One of the three ancient city-cities of Rhodes, located on the southeastern coast of the island, Lindus (or Lindos) was, according to myth, founded by Tlepolemus in the 13th century BCE. The son of Heracles and Astoche, Tlepolemus fled to Rhodes after accidentally or intentionally killing his father’s friend, Licymneus….

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Augusta Bilbilis, Hispania Tarraconensis – Part II

Continued From Augusta Bilbilis Part I The forum of Augusta Bilbilis was inaugurated in 27 CE. It underwent renovations in the Flavian and Antonine periods. Like the theater, the forum too seems to have seen a decline in use during the 3rd century CE. The open plaza of the forum is supported on an artificial…

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Augusta Bilbilis, Hispania Tarraconensis – Part I

Most Recent Visit: July 2022 Perched on a hill overlooking the plain of the Salo (the modern Jalón River) an important tributary of the Iber (the modern Ebro) near the junction with the Birbilis (Jiloca River), about 100 meters above the plain, sits the remains of Augusta Bilbilis. Prior to the arrival of the Romans,…

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Dodona, Epirus – Part II

Continued From Dodona Part I Immediately to the east of the theater are the barely discernible remains of the priest’s house abutting the eastern retaining wall of the theater. The house predates the theater, being built sometime in the latter half of the 4th century BCE. The southeastern corner of the theater actually overlays the…

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Cassope, Epirus

Most Recent Visit: May 2021 It’s not often that I’ll feature a site that has, essentially, almost no period of Roman occupation. This is, after all, what the blog is primarily focused on. But, I certainly don’t limit my visitations to solely Roman sites. Occasionally I’ll visit a site that isn’t Roman, but is still…

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Nicopolis Area, Epirus

Most Recent Visit: May 2021 There are a couple interesting sites worth seeing in the hinterland areas around Nicopolis and Ambracia. Since the Nicopolis aqueduct only takes up a few hours, these are also good options to see in conjunction with that. The first of these is the so-called Necromanteion of Acheron, the famed oracle…

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Nicopolis, Epirus – Part III

Continued From Nicopolis, Epirus Part II Just across the dirt path (where the cardo maximus would have run) to the west of the odeon are the remains of a temple. Like the bathing complex adjacent to the odeon, these remains too are heavily overgrown and difficult to view from the ground, but perhaps a slightly…

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Patrae, Achaea – Part II

Continued From Patrae Part I A couple of blocks to the southwest of Patrae’s odeon, along Sisini, just south of the intersection with Georgiou Roufou, is another set of remains that I wasn’t able to get any conclusive identification of. I wasn’t able to get a very good look either, as it was in a…

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Sicyon, Achaea

Most Recent Visit: May 2021 The founding of the settlement of Sicyon is attributed to the mytho-historical figure Aegialeus, who gave the city its original name, Aigialeia. At other points during the early history of Sicyon, it was apparently also called Telchinia after the mythological Telchines and Mekone, a reference to the poppies that grow…

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